The WHEAT BEER

THE WHEAT BEER

Hazy and cloudy, these fruity and zesty beers are a crisp and refreshing style.

WHEAT GLORIOUS WHEAT

It doesn’t matter if they’re light or dark, or if they’re called Witbier, Weissbier, Dunkel, Hefeweizen or Kristalweizen, Wheat Beers all have one thing in common. They’re made with plenty of (you guessed it!) Wheat.

THE BACKSTORY

Wheat beer has been around for over 1000 years, and it’s still a drink that’s close to its heritage – which was when Germanic tribes began brewing it in the Middle Ages. Rather than the inclusion of wheat being a bit of creative flair, it was a matter of necessity – quite often, there wasn’t enough barley to make beer, so it was substituted with wheat. Because they were much lighter than the traditional dark ales, these beers were given the name Weissbeer – or white beer.

PLEASANT PROTEIN

The grain mix in a wheat beer is made up of malted wheat (anywhere up to 65%) and malted barley.
The added protein from the wheat gives these beers a hazy appearance and a soft, silky mouth-feel.

WHAT TO EXPECT

You first taste a wheat beer with your nose – the aromas range from banana and clove all the way to bubblegum. From there, each variety of wheat beer differs. Traditional Belgian wheat beers – called Witbier – are commonly flavoured with spices like coriander seeds and orange peel, giving them a fruity palate. Unfiltered German wheat beers – called Hefeweizen – have common flavours of banana, bubble gum and vanilla. It’s also worth noting that each of these use wheat differently – Witbiers use un-malted wheat, whereas Hefeweizen brewers malt their wheat first.

FOOD MATCHING

If wheat beer’s on the menu, light foods are the order of the day – especially sushi, steamed mussels or paella.

 

 

 

 

The AMBER ALE

THE AMBER ALE

With their medium body and dry finish amber ales span the middle ground between malt-forward and hoppy beers

IS AMBER ALE PALE?

Typical amber ales have a satisfying malt character and rich, toffee notes that lead to a dry, nutty finish.

Many brewers take a lot of creative license with this diverse style of ale, but the specialty crystal and caramalts used are the masterminds behind the flavours you’ll find in each glass.

DID YOU KNOW?

Amber ales are sometimes known as red ales due to their bright ruby hue courtesy of the various malts used.

WHAT TO EXPECT

Medium malt / gentle hops / toffee, caramel malt / amber to copper hues

THE NAME GAME

Although it’s a complex, rewarding drink, one of the beauties of amber ale lies in its simplicity, which starts with its title: amber colour, amber name.

THE BACKSTORY

Once upon a time, most beers were as dark as porter or stout, until improved malting techniques meant beers became lighter. Still dark by modern standards, they were pale when compared with porter, so they were all called pale ales. Today, the beers we regard as ‘pale’ are downright pallid when compared with the red-flushed older styles, which is why we refer to these flavourful, traditional brews as amber ales.

FOOD MATCHING

As amber ales are relatively dry and rarely cloying, they’re perfectly matched with roasted or barbecued red meat – plus, they’re the perfect accompaniment to hard, nutty cheeses.

Come and and brew your very own version today

– BHB