The GOLDEN ALE

 

The GOLDEN ALE

While tangy, zesty and citrussy, the key to a Golden Ale is a balance of flavours.

GOOD AS GOLD

Around the world golden ales are known by a variety of names, but they all share the distinct orange-gold colour that comes from only using pale malt.

LOW ON FIZZ

This pale malt gives a lighter carbonation than other ales, so it’s the perfect beer to drink if your tummy doesn’t cope with bubbles.

THE BACKSTORY

How do you turn a lager lover into an ale aficionado? With a golden ale! A few brewers created the style in the 1980s when they didn’t own the proper equipment to make lager, but wanted to introduce younger drinkers to the fuller flavours of ale. Golden ale caught on, and has never looked back.

It’s since become a stepping stone for many lager drinkers who want to branch out into a world of beer that holds a little bit more flavour.

FOOD MATCHING

With its refreshing flavours, golden ale is a fantastic partner for light summer meals like cold prawns, Caesar salads or margherita pizza.

WHAT TO EXPECT

Citrus flavours are present in most golden ales, as well as a little bit of sweetness, fruitiness and a floral aroma. The colour is clear and golden.

 

The INDIAN PALE ALE

THE INDIAN PALE ALE

While India pale ales (IPA) are all about the big and bold hop flavours, floral notes, citrus, and light caramel also appear on the palate.

A LONG WAY IN A LEAKY BOAT

When Britain had troops stationed in India, one of the things they missed most about their homeland was a drop of ale. However, when it was brought by boat, it usually went bad before

it could reach them. The solution? Put more hops in
it. Incidentally this not only preserved the beer, but it also created a completely new, extra-hoppy variety.

BACKSTORY

IPAs are all about the hops, which make it one of the most instantly recognizable types
of beer. Once you get that first hoppy hit on the tongue, you know it’s an IPA. Their IBU number is often in the high double figures, and some even make the leap into triple figures.

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE HOPS

Today, India pale ales are still defined by the extra hops added. But modern brewers aren’t so concerned about making sure their beers last a transoceanic voyage. Instead, they’re more concerned with giving you big, hop-fuelled flavours.

FOOD MATCHING

If you’re drinking Indian pale ale, try accompanying it with some spicy Indian cuisine. Or, if you’re going the dessert route, try something with strong flavours: caramel apple tart or blue cheese.

WHAT TO EXPECT

Unsurprisingly, hops dominate the palate. They’re gold to amber in colour with bitterness you won’t find anywhere else. Floral, citrus, and light caramel notes are also common. If you’re not a
fan of hop-overload, you can still enjoy IPAs – some beer makers have taken to including crystal malt as well as pale malt. This results in a darker colour, as well as toffee, caramel and sugar flavours, which help to deliver a smoother hop hit.

 

The PALE ALE

The PALE ALE

Pale Ales use light malts, lots of hops, and are renowned for their hoppy taste, low-to-medium malt presence and crisp, bright bitterness.

A lighter shade of…

As the name suggests, pale ales are lighter in colour than their contemporaries. Put simply,
a higher proportion of pale malts gives pale it’s distinctive hue. But, while they may be moderate, pales are capable of subtle, nuanced taste.

The Back Story

The term ‘pale ale’ was
coined in the early 1700s.
 The beer was a clear, paler
ale developed by British
brewers as an alternative
to dark and traditional
ales. The use of coke, a coal derivative, is something
unique to pale ales and allows
the brewer to produce very pale malts. Over time, different brewing techniques have resulted in a world of pale ale styles.

Different Styles

As more countries made pale ale, each nation put a different spin on the beer. Today, we still use the countries as a style guide to help distinguish different types of pale ale. English is the traditional style, commonly referred to as ‘bitter’. Belgian has a maltier, 
less bitter finish. American
pale ale is characterised by its hops which are added late in the boil. Australian pale ale is our own take on the American style with fewer hops characters and slightly sweeter due to higher yeast content. India pale ale is the big kahuna. We’ll tell you even more about this one on page 12.

What To Expect

Pale ales are renowned for their hoppy taste, low-to-medium malt presence and crisp, bright bitterness. This bitterness is offset by a natural caramel taste, as well as fruity and floral notes. It’s a happy compromise between overpowering hops and lighter, more intricate flavours.

Food Matching

Hoppier flavours and pale malts complement the kind of flavours found in a rack of lamb or a fine steak.

 

Come in and brew your very own today

– BHB