HOW TO SELECT YOUR BREW

HOW TO SELECT YOUR BREW!

Here is an awesome Colour/Flavour scale presented by DM’s. Beers come in all shades, flavours, strengths and consistencies, from the light, floral notes of a wheat beer all the way to the ultra-hoppy flavours of an India pale ale. There’s a whole world of beer to explore, and you can use this chart as a guide to help you discover everything that beer has to offer! Happy Brewing!

– BHB

HOW IS BEER MADE?

HOW IS BEER MADE?

 

Although most of this is already done for you when it comes to extract brewing. It’s always beneficial to have an idea of how the entire brewing process takes place. We don’t wish to scare you away from taking up brewing yourself, but below is a basic outline of what occurs during the brewing process.

 

MALTING

It all starts with the grain
– usually barley – which is turned into malt. This is done by allowing the grain to germinate (which is where a plant begins growing from the grain seed). The growing is then halted by heating and drying the grain on a massive, heated wooden floor. Lighter malts in pale beers are usually kilned for a shorter period than malts in darker beers.

 

MASHING

Next, the dried malt is run through a malt mill. This cracks the malt and helps release the carbohydrates and sugars. The malt is then mixed with hot water, which will convert the starches in the malt into sugar. This is called mashing, and the resulting sticky and sugar-rich mixture is called the ‘wort’.

 

BOILING

The wort is moved to a brew kettle for boiling. The hops are also added, and the whole mixture is boiled to release flavours and aromas. It’s then filtered to remove any solids, and cooled quickly with the help of a cold water heat exchange. Hops will be added earlier to create bitterness and later to increase the aroma.

 

FERMENTATION

This is the most important part, where the yeast is added to the mixture. The yeast converts the sugar in the mash into alcohol and carbon dioxide.

Yeasts can either operate at cool temperatures, known as a bottom fermenting, for lager, or
at warmer temperatures, known as a top fermenting, for ale.

 

AGEING

Once the yeast has converted enough sugars into alcohol, the beer is ready for conditioning or ageing – which can take anywhere from a couple
of weeks to several years. For lagers, it’s important to make sure the beer is stored in cold temperatures. A beer might also; have hops added to it at this stage, undergo
a secondary fermentation in-bottle or be filtered for impurities. Not all beers are filtered, which is why you might notice that some beers are much cloudier than others.

 

BOTTLING

Finally, the beer is bottled, canned or kegged, and sent out into the wide world to be sold.

THE STORY OF BEER

 

What is beer?

Let’s start at the beginning. There is an alcoholic beverage produced by extracting sugar from green, then fermenting the sugar to make alcohol. It’s one of the worlds oldest and most popular drinks, and comes in and enormous range of flavours and colours.

What is it made from?

How do you make beer? With for simple ingredients that unlock a world of possibilities.

Hops | Grain | Yeast | Water

Yep, that’s all you need. With not a single ingredient wasted, the recipe is a testament to simplicity and the ease with which its made is part of the reason why it remains such a popular drink.

 

A RUNDOWN OF THE INGREDIENTS.

Grain

Grain, usually barley, is mixed with water and allowed to germinate. This process, called malting, transfers the grain into malt. This malt is the base for the alcohol to form, it is also responsible for much of a beer’s sweetness.

Water

Every beer starts with good water. And since it makes up 90% of the finished brew, it’s important the Brewers H2O choice is spot on.

Hops

Hops, which are technically a flower, were originally used as a preservative. But today they’re included during brewing to add flavouring, aroma and bitterness to a beer.

Yeast

Yeast is the magical ingredient in a beer. While it doesn’t add a whole lot of flavour, it does extract sugars from the malt, then turns them into alcohol.

 

A BRIEF HISTORY OF BEER

 

3500 BC

Beer is first brewed with barley by the ancient Sumerians and Mesopotamians. They call it a divine drink.

2500 BC

Ancient Syrians produce a range of beers recorded in the Ebla tablets.

1550 BC

Ancient Egyptians were also keen on beer, remains of their malt has been found in the tubes of pharaohs, probably put there to give them sustenance in the afterlife.

The Middle Ages

A huge amount of beer is brewed in monasteries. In some places, monks are allowed to drink up to 5 litres a day.

822 AD

The first recorded use of hops in beer. Before hops, beer was made better with bog myrtle, St John’s wort and elderberries.

1516

Bavarian Duke, William IV, enacts the purity law Rein, which stated the only allowed ingredients of beer were water, hops and barely. Yeast came later.

1796

An ex-convict named James Larra opens Australia’s first pub, the Mason Arms, in Parramatta. The same year, John Boston brews our nation’s first beer in Sydney.

1856

Refrigeration revolutionises the brewing industry, and leads to the proliferation of lager.

1980s

Golden ale is invented by British brewers in an attempt to turn drinkers off lager and onto ale.

1987

The style of ‘dry’ beer was invented in Japan, leading to imitations being created all around the globe, such as Tooheys Extra Dry.